Don’t kill an ant with an atom bomb!

Rather than just doing even more of the same, maybe it’s time to rethink your strategy?!
The way I see it, the origin* of your pain can be located either externally (think muscles and ligaments) or it can be internally (think organ, organ-systems and nerves), even though the symptoms look the same, like back pain.

It is important to know where the origin of your pain is, because how you go about treating the problem should be different depending on what most likely caused it.

How to tell the difference?
Let’s say you overdid it in your last work out session with 100 pushups. Or maybe you spent the whole day digging in the garden. The next day you will have a hard time getting out of bed, your back hurts and you are in agony.

If this is an external problem (muscles, ligaments) you will feel better if you go into the sauna, take a hot bath, get some massage, and do some mobility work. You may not feel back to awesome the first couple of days, and even though your recovery is not a straight line at 45 degrees on the graph, you are constantly and consistently improving. Like on graph 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 2 on the other hand represents more of an internal problem. You think it is an external problem because your back hurts, so you treat it just like in the example above with a hot bath, sauna, massage, mobility work etc.

But, you don’t get much relief. Maybe it feels a bit better for a day or two, or maybe even a week, but then you are right back where you started. This is when you need to ask yourself how is my digestive system really working? How are my kidneys and liver doing? What can I do to help my digestive system and organs?

Did you know that:
   Constipation can cause low back pain and often a deep pain into the hip.
   If you are dehydrated your kidneys don't like it and you could feel tenderness and pain in your low back.
   An overwhelmed liver will indirectly cause pain in your right shoulder.
   Tired kidneys will refer pain to the area of your shoulders and neck.
   Any kind of digestive issue can also cause neck pain via the X cranial nerve, aka the Vagus nerve.
   The pancreas, our super hero of blood sugar regulation will refer pain in between the shoulder blades.

 

If you have already seen a couple of different physios, and a chiropractor, and so on and it doesn’t seem to have helped, finding yet one more will not “fix it”. By now you should have gathered that their working tools are not suited for your particular issue.

If you have had your problems for a longer period of time, and you cannot solve them with your usual methods, it’s time to be smart and start looking at the functions inside the body. Take responsibility for your own health, get involved in the solution, and figure out what you can do daily to help yourself.

Next week we’ll discuss this further by looking at two different case studies.

Don’t kill an ant with an atom bomb. Think more like a ninja, and make a better targeted effort instead.   😉

 



*The origin of your pain does not have to be (and seldom are) where you feel the pain, which is the symptom. If you only put band aids on the symptom but never look for the root cause (the origin) you might never solve the problem at hand. Assuming you didn’t just break your leg in an accident, then of course your pain is where the problem is!
Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
Photo by ARTHUR YAO on Unsplash